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This Sweet Camel Calf Loves Her Mom

Warda—“flower” in Arabic—was severely injured. The sight of her profusely bleeding legs prompted her owner to rush her and her calf, Farah, to PETA’s clinic in Petra, Jordan, in the middle of the night. Frightened and worried that something could happen to her baby, it took help from nearby villagers to restrain her gently and allow clinic staff to treat the multiple deep wounds on her inner front legs.

Warda’s wounds were packed with sand and dirt when she arrived at the clinic.

Warda’s wounds were packed with sand and dirt when she arrived at the clinic.

During the two months that Warda spent as a patient at the clinic, she tolerated daily bandage changes, antibiotics, and pain-relieving medications. The painful gashes were much too large to be sutured, so the staff spoke softly and lovingly during each treatment to reassure the weary camel. It also helped that sweet little Farah (“joy” in Arabic) was always at her side.

Farah stays with her mother, Warda, at PETA’s clinic in Petra.

Camel calves stay close to their mothers for comfort and nourishment during the first few years of their lives. Charming Farah was just 25 days old when her mother was injured!

Farah stands under her mother in the clinic’s yard after Warda’s bandages were removed.

Farah stands under her mother in the clinic’s yard after Warda’s bandages were removed.

Under the staff’s expert care, Warda’s legs healed, and she and Farah were returned to the desert with their owner.

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